Why is it called tipping in America

Tips in the USA - the right "tip"

The amount of tips is rewarded differently around the world. In the US, taxes and tips are usually not included in prices restaurant locked in.

The tax is shown and added on the invoice, but the tip is not. It is expected that you will Waiter leaves a 'tip' (tip is called that in the USA) of 15-20 percent. The operating staff depends on it, as a waiter earns only a very small amount of dollars per hour on average. Also taxi driver, Hairdressers etc. get an average of 15% tip.

Will be in Supermarket When the grocery bag is brought to the parked car, $ 1.00 - 2.00 is due again. In Fast food restaurants and similar establishments do not tip unless you are “served” with drinks and plates. Here you leave about $ 1.00-2.00 on the table. If the services are a bit more extensive (delivery of drinks, etc.) you leave around 5 - 10% of the invoice price. The wait staff does not receive a tip Gas stations.

By the way: If you are particularly satisfied with the service, a tip of the above magnitude is not recognition. Then the tip should increase to 25% or more. On the other hand, if one is dissatisfied, this can easily be expressed by shortening the tip. But there are no rules without exception: In Tourist areas, especially in the Orlando and Miami area of ​​Florida, the service has not had the best experience with European tourists. The service charge is therefore often included in the invoice. So on the note "Tip is included“Pay attention, otherwise you pay twice and that shouldn't be.

The topic of tips is of great importance to the operating staff and therefore of course there is also a homepage called tipping.org on the Internet, which is specifically dedicated to this topic. There are recommendations here not only for the USA, but also for the rest of the world. And since the opinions are of course not always undivided, there is also an extensive discussion forum (English).

    Recommendations on when, to whom and how much should be given:
  • Taxi and limousine drivers (taxi / limo drivers): 15% of the fare, at least $ 2-3; In the case of special assistance such as carrying luggage, etc., correspondingly more. Limousine drivers receive "befitting" 20% of the fare (for luxury limousines!)
  • Porter at the Airport or railway station (porters): $ 1 per piece of luggage, a little more for particularly heavy luggage
  • Porter in the hotel (hotel bellman): Also basically $ 1 per piece of luggage if he has reached the hotel room with the luggage and has briefly explained how it is to be set up; if the porter also helps with check-out, a tip of the same amount is due again. The tip increases accordingly for special services. If you want special "care" during your hotel stay, you should "put in" at least $ 5 right at the beginning.
  • Reception porter (doorman): Usually $ 1 for getting a taxi; for further assistance such as carrying luggage, holding the umbrella protectively, etc. with appropriate "additions"
  • Concierge: Tip is expected for any special service, such as reserving restaurant or theater seats, obtaining tickets for sightseeing tours, etc. The amount depends on the scope of the "service" provided, the standard is between $ 2 and $ 10. If you value special "care", you should use $ 10-20 when you start your stay at the hotel
  • Housekeeping (hotel maid): Are often wrongly "overlooked". If you stay longer than 1 night, $ 1 per day is appropriate, which is left in a labeled envelope or clearly visible on the pillow (if the tip is on the bedside table, it could also be money left by the guest, so that the maid could come under suspicion of theft). By the way: tipping.org recommends at least $ 5 per night; However, that seems excessive to us.
  • Park assistants (parking attendants): $ 2 - $ 3 upon delivery of the car (valet parking)
  • Service in the restaurant / hotel room (waiters): 15 - 20% of the invoice amount before tax (pre-tax check) is standard; this also applies to room service.
  • wardrobe (cloakroom attendants): If a cloakroom fee is charged, a tip is not required, otherwise $ 1 - 2 is appropriate.
  • Toilet staff (rest room attendant): Per “visit” 50 cents to $ 1.
  • Tour guide / bus driver (tour guides / charter bus drivers): For half a day you give 1 $, for a whole day 2 $, for a week trip you should pay at least 5 - 10 $. Privately ordered guides receive higher tips.
  • Card distributor when visiting the casino (dealer): Around $ 5 in cash or chips per session.
  • Beverage waiters when visiting the casino (drink waiter / waitress) should be given $ 1 per drink if it is customary to serve the drinks to the gaming guests free of charge;
  • Staff at the slot machines when visiting the casino: Usually 5 - 10% of the winnings go to the staff at the slot machines. With the one-armed bandits, however, you can give the staff responsible for the machines 1 to 2% of the sum in the event of a win (not necessarily "usual").
  • Cabin crew on cruise ships (cabin / bath steward): The cabin crew receives 5 to 7.5% of the travel price as a tip, spread over the entire journey time, in parts at the end of a week.
  • Waiters on cruise ships (waiter / waitress): Around $ 3 per day per person.
  • Night conductor on the railroad (sleeping car attendant): The night attendant is "happy" with $ 3 to $ 5 per person per day, otherwise the general tips for restaurants apply to the wait staff in the train restaurant.